Navigate Change with eCornell

We know the saying — the only constant in life is change.

Are you prepared to thrive in an ever-changing professional landscape? Being able to navigate change plays a pivotal role in shaping successful careers and organizations. That’s why we’ve designed a diverse range of online certificates and courses, all authored by faculty experts at Cornell University, to equip you with key skills and knowledge needed to pursue change and excel amidst change. 

Here’s a curated list of our programs that support change:

 

1. Change Management Certificate

Learn to anticipate change as a leader and sustain the momentum of your change management initiatives.

  • School: Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
  • Courses: 4 core, 2 elective, plus access to a Live Leadership Symposium
  • Time Commitment: 3 months
  • Faculty Authors: 
    • Cathy Enz, Professor Emeritus, Cornell Nolan School of Hotel Administration
    • Samuel Bacharach, Professor, Cornell ILR School
    • Glen Dowell, Professor, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
    • Kate Walsh, Dean, Cornell Nolan School of Hotel Administration
    • Jan Katz, Senior Lecturer, Cornell Nolan School of Hotel Administration
    • Risa Mish, Professor, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
    • Rohit Verma, Professor, Cornell Nolan School of Hotel Administration
    • Angela Noble-Grange, Senior Lecturer, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
    • Tony Simons, Professor, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
    • Robert Bloomfield, Professor of Management, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
    • Christopher Collins, Associate Professor, Cornell ILR School

 

2. Change, Disruption, and Growth Course 

Assess industry disruptions, evaluate organizational responses, and devise strategies for successful adaptation and growth.

  • School: Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
  • Course Length: 2 weeks
  • Faculty Author: Justin Johnson, Professor, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business

 

3. Communication Planning for Change Course 

Analyze audiences affected by anticipated organizational changes and develop a communication plan.

  • School: Cornell SC Johnson College of Business
  • Course Length: 2 weeks
  • Faculty Author: Amy Newman, Senior Lecturer, Cornell SC Johnson College of Business

 

4. DEI: Dialogue for Change Certificate

Gain essential skills and insights for driving diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives within your organization and community.

  • School: Cornell ILR School
  • Courses: 3 courses plus access to a Live DEI Symposium
  • Time Commitment: 2.5 months
  • Faculty Authors: 
    • Lisa Nishii, Professor and Vice Provost, Cornell ILR School
    • Adi Grabiner-Keinan, Executive Director for Academic DEI Education and Director of the Intergroup Dialogue Project, Cornell ILR School

 

5. Equitable Community Change Certificate 

Learn to manage development and changes across all sectors of society to build more equitable, just, and sustainable communities.

  • School: Cornell ILR School
  • Courses: 6
  • Time Commitment: 3 months
  • Faculty Authors: 
    • Sam Magavern, Senior Policy Fellow, Partnership for the Public Good
    • Russell Weaver, Director of Research, Cornell ILR Buffalo Co-Lab

 

6. Healthcare Change Management Certificate 

Understand, measure, implement, and lead successful change management initiatives in the healthcare sector.

  • School: Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy
  • Courses: 4 courses plus access to a Live Leadership Symposium
  • Time Commitment: 2 months
  • Faculty Author: Nick A. Fabrizio, Senior Lecturer, Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy

7. Leading Organizational Change Course

Explore your own leadership style and practice skills to translate transformative ideas into organizational results.

  • School: Cornell ILR School
  • Course Length: 2 weeks
  • Faculty Author: Samuel Bacharach, Professor, Cornell ILR School

 

8. Leading Strategic Change Initiatives Course

Cultivate your ability to assess the need for strategic change within your organization.

  • School: Cornell Nolan School of Hotel Administration
  • Course Length: 2 weeks
  • Faculty Author: Cathy Enz, Professor Emeritus, Cornell Nolan School of Hotel Administration

 

9. Making Strategic Change Happen Course 

Assess organizational readiness to effectively carry out change initiatives that drive growth and success.

  • Course Length: 2 weeks
  • Faculty Author: Cathy Enz, Professor Emeritus, Cornell Nolan School of Hotel Administration

 

Whether you’re looking to advance your career, drive organizational transformation, or make a positive impact in your community, we’re here to support your journey.

Cornell Keynotes podcast: The American South braces for a huge unionization push

Auto worker using tools on metal car parts

Will auto industry unionization in Tennessee and Alabama galvanize a new labor movement in the South?

In a new episode of the Cornell Keynotes podcast from eCornell, Andrew Wolf, a professor of global labor and work at Cornell’s ILR School, joins host Chris Wofford to discuss the opportunities and challenges ahead for both auto manufacturing companies and labor organizers.

Unionization is shaking up the auto industry, delivering meaningful gains toward fair pay and other benefits for workers in the U.S. The efforts are particularly significant in the South where a legacy of racist labor laws continues to propagate disparity within the workforce.

Listen to Episode 32: “The American South Braces for a Huge Unionization Push” and read more on the Chronicle.

eCornell joins the Guild & Team USA Learning Network to support athletes

Laptop user sitting in hammock on the beach

By Molly Israel

Through the Guild and Team USA Learning Network, eCornell will be the preferred provider of professional education for Team USA over the next five years. The collaboration is designed to connect Team USA athletes—including Olympic and Paralympic athletes and hopefuls—with eCornell’s professional certificate programs that can help them build new skills off the field and propel their careers beyond athletics.

eCornell’s flexible, online certificate programs are uniquely suited to support Team USA athletes. 43% of Team USA athletes report working full or part-time jobs while training and the average age at which a Team USA athlete ends their Olympic or Paralympic career is 28.

“eCornell is proud to collaborate with Guild to support Team USA athletes,” said Paul Krause, vice provost of external education and executive director of eCornell. “Our professional certificate programs blend Cornell’s impactful education with online flexibility, empowering athletes to forge new career paths and transition seamlessly to what’s next.”

Read more on the Cornell Chronicle.

Cornell public health certificate closes 8 primary skill gaps for students

Recent global events have underscored a pressing truth: our ever-expanding interactions with the natural world can lead to unforeseen health challenges. At the juncture of urban development, climate change and health concerns, the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic raised the necessity to strengthen our public health infrastructure.

Through its new Public Health Essentials online certificate program, Cornell seeks to help leaders proactively address today’s global health challenges.

“COVID-19 came and showed us that our public health workforce was underprepared and that our public health systems were not equipped to detect and respond to an emerging pandemic,” said Gen Meredith, associate professor of public and ecosystem health and associate director of the Cornell Master of Public Health (MPH) Program.

Meredith, co-author of the university’s Public Health Essentials certificate program with Alexander Travis, professor and MPH program director, developed the coursework to address real-world applications for health professionals, community health advocates, volunteers and other emerging leaders in public health. The program begins with the basic foundations of public health, including the latest terminology, and moves into topics such as driving action with data and supporting behaviors that prevent disease. Courses include:

  • Public Health Foundations
  • Assessing and Implementing Public Health
  • Using Public Health Data for Action
  • Supporting Public Health Behaviors
  • Public Health Preparedness

Participants complete the facilitator-guided online program with a cohort of fellow professionals within four months. Research from Meredith, Travis and coauthors from the MPH program shows significant improvement among learners across eight critical skill areas: systems and strategic thinking; community engagement; cross-sectoral partnership; policy engagement; diversity, equity and inclusion; data-informed decision making, effective communication and programmatic expertise.

“The way that globalization is happening around the world and the way that humans are using the natural environment around us is creating real risk for the emergence of new diseases, and this comes at a time when humans are already vulnerable because of chronic diseases and other environmental conditions we are facing on a day-to-day basis,” said Meredith.

The Public Health Essentials program intends to drive actions that contribute to disease prevention and global community well-being. In earning the certificate, leaders can gain new knowledge and skills to navigate the complexities of worldwide health challenges, strengthen healthcare systems and enhance preparedness.

Enroll in Cornell’s Public Health Essentials certificate program to explore the global challenges alongside best practices from experts.

Success After Service: The Veteran’s Guide to Choosing an Online Certificate Program

Soldier in Army shirt works at laptop computer

By Teresa Duncan, Ph.D., CSM(R), Director of Military Programs at eCornell

Transitioning from active duty to civilian life can lead to a profound sense of fulfillment and significant challenges. Many veterans are equipped with industry-specific service experience, but complex job markets still often present obstacles to employment.

Online certificate programs offer veterans opportunities to acquire new skills and knowledge, demonstrate commitment to particular career fields and build networks of like-minded leaders – all essential factors in securing professional roles. However, selecting the right program is key. Here are four questions veterans should consider when determining which online education programs would be most valuable for their future.

Does the program align with my background and goals?

Leveraging current skills can be advantageous in the effort to bridge the gap between military experience and civilian job requirements. For example, if a veteran has experience in logistics, a program in supply chain management or project leadership might be a natural fit.

It is important to understand the options. In evaluating course content, prerequisites and outcomes, a veteran may find unexpected alignment with goals that diverge from their background and sync with their transferable skills. A former Army civil affairs specialist might excel in a PR strategy certificate program that covers crisis communication planning or discover new ways to lead through an international public and NGO management program.

To choose the best path, it is valuable to first complete a self-assessment of strengths and areas for growth, then list short- and long-term career objectives. The program a veteran selects should align with the needs and goals they identify.

Is the program flexible enough to fit my schedule and lifestyle?

Online learning makes professional development more accessible than ever. The most popular types of online learning models include:

100% Asynchronous – This on-demand style of learning is the most flexible. Learners can complete assignments at any time, and there is no direct interaction with faculty, industry specialists or peers to discuss ideas or answer questions. Without additional structure, some learners find it difficult to complete the courses or apply what they learn without support.

Asynchronous and interactive – This model permits students to log in and learn at their convenience while connecting learners to professionals and peers. There may be requirements to complete assignments through discussion boards with classmates. Plus, instructors are on hand to give feedback and help students stay on track to apply what they learn to their current or future jobs.

Synchronous – This style is the least flexible and most interactive. Courses are delivered live by instructors, and learners must attend at specific times to participate.

It can be helpful for veterans to explore programs with self-paced options or accommodations for irregular schedules. The selected program should also match their individual learning style and offer a multitude of instructional approaches, including video lectures, downloadable guides, discussion forums and peer collaboration.

Will I receive academic support to complete the program?

Resource access is a significant consideration for any educational venture. Students should be able to reach advisors or facilitators in the virtual learning environment as easily as they could by visiting their physical offices. When searching for the right-fit online certificate, veterans should ensure there are clear methods for learners to contact staff who can offer guidance on the course materials, answer questions or address technical issues.

Veterans may also take their team-oriented experience into account and select programs that offer cohort-based learning, study groups or symposiums. Peer interactions can provide camaraderie and motivation to complete complex assignments and offer an expanded network that learners can tap into throughout their careers.

It is also necessary to assess financial resources. Programs that accept veteran benefits or offer payment plans are better for budgets and vital to maintaining other economic aspects of the transition to a civilian lifestyle.

How will the program advance my career or improve my prospects for the future?

As technology continues to transform business and hiring practices, it is more important to stand out in the pool of candidates with advanced education or training from reputable institutions. The most beneficial online certificate programs for veterans will deliver content developed by distinguished faculty and industry experts, course tools that can be used on the job and credits toward professional certifications. These advantages empower vets to tie their military service to current specialized skills that employers need.

Ultimately, a certificate is a valued addition to a resume. Completing an online learning program is also a gateway to building the confidence, connections, and qualifications that shape lives beyond the workplace.

Would an asynchronous and interactive online certificate program align with your goals? If so, Cornell University provides more than 130 online certificate programs that can help you upskill as you serve or prepare to transition. Cornell was recently named the #1 Best College for Veterans by U.S. News & World Report, and its online programs are directly authored by Cornell faculty and guided by professional industry facilitators. Small cohorts enable students to develop valuable connections that position them for success in a variety of fields. You can get started today with Credentialing Assistance or VA education benefits. Learn more at ecornell.cornell.edu.

Watch “Cornell’s Military History: A Legacy of Service.”

 

The Age of the Mompreneur: Empowering Working Mothers

Modern societal shifts and emerging trends in the startup ecosystem present new challenges and opportunities for women, particularly for mompreneurs – those juggling the responsibilities of motherhood and entrepreneurship. The success of early-stage enterprises founded and led by women depends greatly on dismantling systemic barriers, including the uneven distribution of venture capital.

In the recent Keynote webcast “The Boss of Me: Entrepreneurship and Motherhood,” Andrea Ippolito – CEO of SimpliFed, director of Women Entrepreneurs Cornell, and lecturer in the university’s engineering management program – shared her experiences as a mother and businesswoman, delivering compelling insights into what it takes for women to thrive as working mothers in today’s competitive, fast-paced labor market. 

How has the landscape of entrepreneurship changed for mompreneurs, particularly during and after the COVID-19 pandemic?

“What happened is that by forcing us to be at home, we showed folks that we can be effective and efficient, despite what some CEOs are saying. We actually saw an increase of women starting companies. When you look at 2019 compared to 2021, in 2019, there were a whole lot less women starting companies, 28%. Whereas during the pandemic, 49% of new companies were started by women. It was a much more flexible work environment.

Before the pandemic, it was all about meeting in person or working through stakeholder meetings in person. My journey looked a lot different than someone that was in their 20s, pre-kids, that could hustle 24/7. And don’t get me wrong, I hustle 24/7. My effectiveness and efficiency of working has always been pretty “right on” with having kids. But the time horizon has taken me a little longer.”

What are some of the largest hurdles working mothers encounter when trying to found a startup, and how does societal infrastructure play a part in this?

“The infrastructure is not in place to help support [founders], especially parents, whether that’s paid parental leave, universal child care support. There are so many things that we need to do as a society to better support entrepreneurs getting their organizations off the ground.

Startups founded by women are more profitable, and they exit faster. If you are an investor, it’s in your best performance interest for your fund to invest in women. If we want to have a more profitable economy, and we know that startups are the engine for that, then we need more folks participating. And the biggest pool of people we’re not taking advantage of right now is women. We need to rethink the structures to help support them.”

What are your secrets to striking a healthy work-life balance that comes with being a businesswoman and a mother?

“One of the things we see often is, especially for women that are parents, is they feel like they have to hide different parts of their life. For me, I have a five-year-old. I have a two-year-old and a T-minus five-week-old. And I don’t try to hide it. There are times where, yes, I don’t want them around because I want to focus 100%. But I also don’t try to hide it.

There’s this big misconception that people are taking off in the middle of the workday, and they’re not focused. The reality is that by giving folks a more flexible schedule, you actually get more out of them. They value their work. They’re aligned with your mission. But you’re also respecting them as a human being as well.”

Can you share your insights on the bias in investment toward women-led startups? How does this coincide with major life events like motherhood?

“We know that women [are] seen as less investable. There are tremendous biases out there, no doubt. And the research has shown that. One of the things that I feel very strongly about is that by the time a woman gets enough experience, expertise, and confidence, it’s around the same time that she’s having kids. One of the challenges is how do you start a company when you have this crazy unpredictable life of being a parent.

Venture capitalists have to raise money from somewhere. They have to raise money from what are called limited partners, or LPs. And those limited partners are pension funds, college endowments, sovereign wealth. And so we need folks like limited partners, like college endowments, to actually invest more in women-led funds.”

How can businesses better support working mothers, particularly with regards to incorporating child care into their business models?

“I think more and more, we need to have universal child care as a federally-funded entity. The companies that find ways to support child care or maybe fund it as a benefit will do better. And so I think there’s a responsibility of larger organizations to have this as a benefit. And then for, say, small businesses where they don’t have, frankly, those types of funds or resources, I do think [we need] a government federal response. It’s good for our economy. It pays for itself. It creates an engine in our economy.”

In a rapidly evolving entrepreneurial world, businesswomen are breaking down barriers, mastering the juggling act of work-life integration, and shaping business models to include family needs. Learn how to navigate a tech career as a woman leader in Cornell’s Women in Product certificate program, designed by Andrea Ippolito or gain a better understanding of funding models in Cornell’s Startup Funding and Finance certificate.

What is Your Style of Decision-Making? Strategize for Influence.

Imagine unlocking the secret to success in both business and day-to-day life. It’s all rooted in one critical talent: strategic decision-making – the essence of exceptional leadership, the engine driving meaningful change, and the spark igniting innovation.

Cheryl Strauss Einhorn, adjunct professor in Cornell’s SC Johnson College of Business, is a pioneer in shaping our understanding of this crucial skill. She is an accomplished author, educator, the creator of the AREA Method – a game-changing problem-solving approach – and the author of the Complex Decision-Making Cornell certificate program.

Her insights have reshaped how leaders steer their decision-making strategies and offer valuable lessons for navigating the complexity of the corporate world and your career.

Einhorn shared some key decision-making guidelines in a recent Keynotes webcast hosted by eCornell:

Understanding Strategic Choices

Einhorn believes that our problem-solving styles are behaviors with which we feel most adept and comfortable. She asserts, “we all have a comfort, a dominant problem solver profile. And we can all become more dynamic problem solvers.” This perspective champions the inherent adaptability within each of us to navigate different problem-solving styles.

The Adaptability of Problem-Solving Styles

Contrary to popular belief, problem-solving styles aren’t prescriptive. Instead, they offer space for adaptability and growth. Acknowledging our problem-solving styles provides a valuable opportunity for self-awareness and interpersonal development.

Einhorn defines five distinct styles of decision making that offer unique perspectives into the world of strategic problem solving:

The Adventurer: Einhorn describes the adventurer as “a very decisive decision maker. She knows what she wants. The future is endlessly more interesting than the present.”

The Detective: With a strong need for concrete evidence, the detective is “a slower decision maker because she wants to find data.”

The Listener: This style of decision maker is “relational, collaborative, trusting,” Eihorn said. “She emphasizes the importance of gathering input, and she likes to gather the wisdom and opinions of others.”

The Thinker: Someone who “values understanding the why and thinking about the different options.” This style represents a “thoughtful, careful decision maker.”

The Visionary: “A big, creative, out-of-the-box thinker.” Einhorn warns, however, that “this kind of decision maker could have a planning fallacy.” Visionaries can dream big and are often the source of innovative ideas, but they must stay grounded to avoid unrealistic expectations.

Decision-making styles are dynamic, changeable over time, and influenced by various factors such as age, experiences, and environments. For example, your style at work might differ from your style at home. Einhorn explains that you have the freedom to choose your problem-solving style based on the situation: “You could decide that you want to plan a meal as a visionary. You want to take a vacation as an adventurer. You want to buy insurance as a detective. And each of these opportunities are available to you once you understand the five different profiles.”

No “Perfect” Combination

Harnessing the power of strategic decision makers isn’t about achieving a “perfect” combination of problem-solving styles. The real value lies in understanding and leveraging diverse profiles to become more effective leaders.

Awareness of these profiles can offer insights into the kind of information each leader needs and highlight any cognitive biases that might obstruct effective problem solving. “You can learn what this means that you’re good at and the places where each of us might have mental mistakes that are most relevant to getting in our way. And then how we can make better choices together,” Einhorn said.

With this knowledge, we can fill gaps in perspective, ensure a more comprehensive understanding of situations, and contribute more effectively to collective problem-solving processes to foster strategic leadership and decision making.

In mastering the craft of strategic leadership, we pave our own route toward personal and professional achievement. Adopt an introspective approach and learn to leverage your unique problem-solving styles in Cornell’s Complex Decision-Making certificate program. You’ll gain a dynamic skill set to boost your confidence, empower your choices, and drive significant change in all aspects of your life.

Watch Einhorn’s Making Difficult Decisions Keynote webcast on the eCornell website.

4 Ways to Leverage AI in Your Corporate Strategy

Rendering of pathways in the human brain with a lighted background

With the swift expansion of artificial intelligence, automation tools are now readily available to corporations and consumers alike. Companies are integrating new technologies to avoid falling behind their competition and appearing out of touch with trends that matter to their employees and customers.

But the steps to incorporate and embrace emerging tech can be challenging. Expert faculty from the Graduate School of Management at Cornell’s SC Johnson College of Business identified four best practices senior executives can employ to capitalize on advancements in AI and dodge common pitfalls.

1. Innovate early – with startup partners.

In its 2022 Global AI Adoption Index, IBM reported that 35 percent of companies were using AI and 42 percent were exploring AI for future implementation. Findings from Grand View Research indicate this tech adoption will drive the market size to $1.8 billion in revenue within seven years. To remain competitive in this environment, leaders can collaborate across companies to use AI in ways that set them apart from major rivals.

Swift changes in tech-driven markets demand innovation and adaptation, but many businesses are optimized to resist change rather than embrace it, leading to fewer risks – and rewards. The hesitation to adopt can be a danger to the bottom line.

“Executives can avoid this stumbling block by implementing agile methods and building mutually beneficial partnerships with startups driving innovation in their areas of need,” said Stephen Sauer, senior lecturer of management and organizations and Entrepreneur in Residence for the college. “Established companies can benefit from the tech experimentation that is more common in newer businesses while giving these partners the wisdom of experience.”

Karan Girotra, Charles H. Dyson Family professor of technology and management, adds that when tech advances rapidly in times of political and socioeconomic uncertainty, leaders can underestimate the rate of change and overestimate the ability of past expertise in helping them tackle the environment.

“Executives need to adopt a learn-it-all, not a know-it-all, mindset. Leaders need to embrace smart, cheap and fast experimentation to try out many new initiatives and learn fast,” Girotra said.

2. Choose accuracy over convenience.

Information may be more accessible than ever, but discerning fact from fiction grows more difficult each day. The convenience and speed of generative AI make it easier for audiences to accept and share information without examination. However, the perils of using incorrect data, which range from operational shortfalls and security threats to public relations crises and financial losses, can ruin organizations.

“The increasing amounts of misinformation with which we are all confronted today – including from AI errors – can undermine our problem-solving efforts,” said Risa Mish, professor of practice of management. “Now, more than ever, leaders must be able to guide their teams in understanding what we know versus what we are assuming we know.”

According to Mish, AI exists to help us tackle complex issues in a way that balances efficiency, thoroughness and accuracy, but leaders should be willing to learn how to apply the technology responsibly.

“Corporate decision-makers should first work to comprehend core AI concepts. Then start with small-scale projects to test the tech in their operations,” Mish said. “This requires leaders to build cross-functional teams that understand the organization’s strategy and can align AI with goals.”

3. Recognize your biases.

Incorporating machine intelligence into business operations may require leaders to reassess their approach to corporate ethics. AI systems operate on data provided by humans and can perpetuate prejudices as a result. If not carefully monitored, this can lead to unfair outcomes for workers, customers and other stakeholders.

“Leaders need to be aware that we are all susceptible to biases which can negatively impact our decision-making and behavior. We naturally look for, remember, favor and interpret information in a way that confirms our previously held beliefs or values. We also discount or reject information that runs counter to these beliefs and values,” said Michelle Duguid, associate professor and associate dean of diversity, inclusion and belonging.

While AI can expedite decision-making for hiring, business forecasting, surveillance and more, Duguid encourages senior executives and their teams to take precautions against complacency. Instead, firms can develop quality assurance processes to ensure automated outputs meet their corporate standards.

“Senior executives need to be able to think strategically about potential risks and challenges, and make informed decisions that align with the company’s overall goals and values,” said Sauer. “Strategic thinking is a team effort, and the more leaders are able to build teams with diverse opinions and experiences – what we call ‘heterogeneous task cognition’ – the more successful they will be in combating any biases that might creep in with the use of AI and other digital technologies.”

4. Use AI as a supplement, not a replacement.

More than 40% of business owners are concerned about an overdependence on AI, according to a recent Forbes Advisor survey. Automation has the potential to replace human workers in certain roles, leading to job displacement, changes in employment patterns and economic disruption.

“Advances in AI and other digital technologies present businesses with a once-in-a-generation opportunity to reinvent their products and processes,” said Girotra. “At the same time, there are several pitfalls – technologies that do not live up to their promise, new business models that have no feasible path to profitability, the large negative externalities that these innovations place on society. Businesses that blindly embrace these opportunities, or those that are paralyzed by the pitfalls, are unlikely to survive.”

Looking at AI as a tool with capabilities and limits, and creating a builder culture, Girotra says, is key in taking advantage of the opportunities.

Elizabeth Mannix, Ann Whitney Olin professor of management agrees. When leaders have self-awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses – and they are cognizant of their impact on others – they can lead with intention and create an environment in which their team members can thrive alongside AI.”

 

Faculty from Cornell University have designed online certificate programs on a variety of in-demand leadership, technology, business and finance topics, including change management and digital transformation. An AI strategy certificate from the SC Johnson College of Business is also available online through eCornell.

Cornell Tech launches new product, technology leadership program

Students at Cornell Tech

As the demand for product managers and tech executives continues to grow, Cornell Tech has purposefully designed a flagship Product and Tech Executive Leadership Program in collaboration with eCornell, offering professionals a unique opportunity to enhance their leadership skills and take their tech innovation strategies to the next level. The program aims to equip participants with the necessary expertise to navigate the rapidly evolving digital landscape.

Designed for mid and senior-level product managers, engineering leaders and technology professionals with experience leading teams, the three-day immersive program will take place Sept. 19 to 21, 2023, at Cornell Tech in New York, NY.

Read the full story on the Cornell Chronicle.

Cornell debuts biotech, pharma management program

Networking at Cornell Tech

As biotechnology and pharmaceutical professionals continue efforts to make advances in medicinal drug formulation, safety and efficacy, experts in the field are implementing innovations to address regulatory hurdles, research costs and global health challenges.

The new Biotech and Pharmaceutical Management Program offered through the Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy is designed to give leaders the opportunity to explore industry trends and cutting edge research with a cohort of peers, executives and renowned faculty from the university.

Read the full story on the Cornell Chronicle.