Top 3 Things Every HR Pro Needs to Know About Social Media Policies

Companies are looking to HR to answer their social media policy questions.

Here are three (3) key policy-making strategies I’ve learned during my 16 years as an executive-level HR practitioner:

1. Employees want to do a great job: Make it easy

A job isn’t just a paycheck and benefits; most employees want to do a great job for their companies, and they consistently rank being recognized for their work as a top motivator.

Once their pay and benefits needs are met, employees want to know that their efforts are valued and contribute to company success. To that end, companies should enable — not inhibit — employees from getting things done and doing their best.

Providing technology tools, such as social media, is one way to empower and engage employees to work smarter, not harder.

Social media can speed innovation, collaboration and communication — but only if employees know how to use it within a well-defined framework. Social media policies that recognize this, and attempt to appropriately empower rather than inappropriately control employees, are an essential tool for helping employees succeed.

2. Discipline will set you (and them) free

I’ve found that when policies incorporate employee input, employees themselves become the strongest advocates for compliance. Employees need to understand the purposes served by social media policies, and that they aren’t simply additional burdens on getting work done.

How do you build this understanding? By soliciting employee input for creating disciplined — not restrictive — policies, and then training and certifying them to implement these policies.

Educated employees become proud, and confident, internal advocates for compliance. You know you’ve been successful when you hear someone say, “While I don’t like this Facebook policy, I understand why our company needs it.

3. Top down, bottom up: Multiple perspectives get buy-in

Social media is about personalizing experience, whether for employees working inside your organization or customers engaging with your products outside. And VPs have differing perspectives from entry-level managers on what those experiences should be.

By developing social media policies that incorporate perspectives from all employees, you can better balance your organization’s cultural needs against an appropriate level of risk management.

Moreover, this approach fosters buy-in. Employees at all levels feel seen and understood, which lays the groundwork for success.

Guest Post on TLNT

 

Cornell University Embraces Flexible Work Plans

In the midst of companies like Yahoo and Best Buy re-evaluating their remote work plans and calling some workers back into the office, Cornell University is only planning on expanding their remote and flexible work plans, including them in a multitude of programs and plans across campus.

In the past 25 years, Cornell University has really shifted from looking at flexible work as a means to accommodate working families to really starting to treat it as part of our organizational business strategy. And I think that this is very evident in our 2010-2015 University Strategic Plan. It’s very specific in stating that we will sustain and expand flexible work arrangements whenever feasible. So I think that the attention is certainly placed on that as a means to driving our university forward.

Another plan that was recently created in 2012 is called Toward New Destinations. And the emphasis of that plan is really addressing diversity and inclusion in our workplace and in our student bodies. You may think that flexible work arrangements won’t have a home in addressing diversity and inclusion, but really the way that we look at diversity issues is that we want to create, foster, support a very diverse workplace environment for all kinds of employees and personal life experiences. And flexible work is just one tool in a large basket of work life programs that can do as such.

A third Cornell University plan, the Cornell Climate Action Plan, really takes a look at reducing carbon footprint, the amount of traffic that we have coming to campus, and the demands that we have on our parking infrastructure. Obviously, remote work among other types of flexible work arrangements like compressed  work is a means to being able to support those goals and those priorities.

And, lastly, I would add that even the federal government is taking a look at flexible work arrangements as a means to creating a very diverse workforce and using it as a tool to address issues like emergency planning and really just trying to have the most diverse and engaged workforce as possible.

Yahoo’s Remote Work is the Solution, Not the Problem

Yahoo, Bank of America, and Best Buy’s decisions to curtail remote work for their employees has certainly stirred up quite a bit of attention as they come at a time when other major companies are ramping up their remote work policies. Even many government agencies worldwide are urging employees and employers alike to consider remote work as an opportunity for better work/life balances and increased innovation and productivity.

Nearly 25% of Americans are participating in some kind of remote work situation, even if it is limited, and this number is on the rise. Flexibility is key for most people and some even say they would take a pay cut to have more of this flexibility in their work arrangement. With advances in technology and increased understanding of how to manage remote work employees, companies can keep their eyes on the productivity prize.

Remote work isn’t the problem for Yahoo, Bank of America, or Best Buy. Wherever employees work, they need to be well managed and engaged with their coworkers. If productivity and engagement are the real problems behind why they are calling everyone home, they should address those problems directly and deal with the cultural change within the organization.

Johnson Controls, Inc., Selects eCornell to Deliver Online Human Resources Training

Global, diversified technology and industrial leader to run pilot program targeting HR professionals

Johnson Controls, Inc., a global diversified company in the building and automotive industry, has selected eCornell to deliver a pilot program to its human resources managers and directors.

Launching the program by offering a course from Cornell’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations, “Developing People Solutions for Business Success,” Johnson Controls, Inc., will provide HR managers and directors an understanding of the value their business organization offers its customers and of how that value is created.

With a global presence in over 150 countries, it is important that Johnson Controls offer a learning solution that is high-caliber and easily accessible. This course will allow Johnson’s HR managers and directors to connect in-depth knowledge of the business with HR expertise, to identify and anticipate issues, offer solutions, and take actions that drive business success.

eCornell’s unique approach to elearning combines the most effective elements of a world-class, Ivy League classroom with the flexibility of an online learning environment. eCornell courses—self-paced and 100 percent online—are “instructor-facilitated” to help guide a cohort of 20 to 30 participants through challenging, real-world exercises with practical on-the-job application. Classes enable learners to be immersed in learning that also fosters collaboration, interaction and networking.

“We are pleased to be working with Johnson Controls, Inc., and looking forward to helping them achieve their learning outcomes for their HR audience,” said Tom Abogabal, vice president of global sales at eCornell.  “Johnson Controls, Inc., is a global leader in its field, and we are thrilled to be partnering with them to help HR be an effective strategic business partner to their internal clients.”

About eCornell

eCornell, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cornell University, provides many of the world’s leading organizations with online professional and executive development in the areas of leadership and management, human resources, financial management, healthcare, marketing, and hospitality management. eCornell’s proven course development model and asynchronous instructor-led course delivery provide for engaging, rigorous, and interactive learning. The company has delivered online courses to more than 50,000 students in over 200 countries. For more information visit www.ecornell.com/enterprise (enterprise buyers) or www.ecornell.com (small groups and individual students).

 

About Johnson Controls, Inc.

Johnson Controls is a global diversified technology and industrial leader serving customers in more than 150 countries. Its 168,000 employees create quality products, services, and solutions to optimize energy and operational efficiencies of buildings, lead-acid automotive batteries and advanced batteries for hybrid and electric vehicles, and interior systems for automobiles. In 2012, Corporate Responsibility Magazine recognized Johnson Controls as the #5 company in its annual “100 Best Corporate Citizens” list. The company was formerly known as Johnson Electric Service Company, changing its name to Johnson Controls, Inc., in 1974. Johnson Controls, Inc., was founded in 1885 and is headquartered in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

What Can Certificate-level Credentials Do For the HR Pro

As you know, in human resources, credentials are king. Typically, employers require at least a certificate-level credential for an entry-level position in HR. Human resources certificates demonstrate competence and proficiency and are a great way for you to set yourself apart from the pack. An HR certificate shows that you have knowledge, expertise and a dedication to your continuing education and profession.

On the other side, a human resources certificate helps hiring managers make sound decisions when considering HR employees. It provides a benchmark for measuring proficiencies. Across all industries, candidates with HR certificates are more valued and sought-after than those without.

Taking things one step further, many professionals in the field enter certificate programs that also include HR certification. It’s important to make a clear distinction between an HR certificate and HR certification. Earning an HR certificate is essentially a one-time achievement while certification requires periodic renewal of credentials. In the United States, certified HR professionals are educated and evaluated by an accrediting body like the Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI), or the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).
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Awesome 32-page HR report condensed to 8 bullet points

Here’s a time-saving hack for HR pros: read this 8-point synopsis before you fully commit to reading the entire Deloitte survey: Transformative Technologies Driving Human Resource Organizations to ‘Leap Ahead’ in 2012.

This report focuses on 8 human capital trends you need to understand in order to deliver top-notch HR  in 2012.

  1. In 2012, growth is job#1: As the economy sloooowly recovers, growth is the word on everyone’s lips. Innovation, emerging markets and mergers and acquisitions all play a major role in the growth strategy. Capitalize on opportunities by informing and shaping the growth agenda from the HR seat, identifying places where HR will have to “step-up” to make a growth strategy happen smoothly.
  2. Operation globalization: Global integration models of doing business are on the rise. Your company’s home market becomes one in a pool of markets you serve, as opposed to the “top-dog” position it traditionally held. HR operations will have to be prepared for global people management and change management, designing global operating models for the HR side of business.
  3. Fast track to the top: AKA the development of high-potential employees to meet the demands of emerging markets and growth opportunities.
  4. People risk is risky business: In the world of “black swans” (Not the crazy ballet dancer from the movie of the same name but the low-probability event that has far-reaching ramifications), HR’s role in managing risk becomes stronger and more expansive. Risk-management becomes a day-to-day responsibility.
  5. Seeing around corners: Using workforce reporting and analytics to manage uncertainty and look for patterns in an increasingly complex workforce-management world. Are you using the data you gather, or is it siloed somewhere far away from the heart of the business?
  6. #social #mobile@work: Social Media and mobile devices create opportunities for HR to reach out to recruits and help internal customers, not just spy on people’s FB pages. Communities of practice and other great tools for your workforce spring from these exciting platforms.
  7. Clouds in the forecast: Cloud services are changing the way business operates, and HR has a key role in helping organizations adapt. HR’s role as an early adopter of many cloud-based services makes it a “no-brainer” as the de facto leader in organizational change around the cloud.
  8. Stay in front with an effective sales force: Multichannel sales require different skill sets and tools for the sales team. HR’s talent management, learning and development all must review current practices and make changes to benefit from this new model.

Warning: trying to implement all 8 at the same time may cause your head to explode. Select the relevant items that support the c-suite strategic agenda and crank them up. Then sit back and revel in the accolades. Good job!

Building a Global Talent Management Strategy

If you missed the eCornell webinar titled Building a Global Talent Management Strategy and would like to view it, or would like to share with colleagues, the archive is available at ecornell.cornell.edu/mar14archive. The presentation slides are at ecornell.cornell.edu/mar14ppt.

In today’s marketplace, going global is more necessity than luxury, as businesses regularly find customers, suppliers and partners from all over the map. That broader focus for business requires a global talent management strategy to properly support a global initiative.

We’ll show you what a global talent management strategy consists of, how to build one that delivers measurable business outcomes and how to deploy to a diverse global workforce. During this interactive webinar, Heidi Spirgi, co-founder and president of Knowledge Infusion, will walk you through the process and steps organizations need to go through to build and deploy a global talent management strategy:

  • How to tie your talent management strategy to business initiatives.
  • The importance of developing a long-term talent management strategy to have better business results.
  • How a successful talent management strategy is one designed for the workforce, not the HR department.
  • Why HR departments cannot focus on “go live” when deploying talent management solutions, but rather must focus on user adoption and outputs, ensuring the new system is driving outcomes aligned with the business, not HR goals.

 

 

Learn How to Build a Global Talent Management Strategy

In today’s marketplace, going global is more necessity than luxury, as businesses regularly find customers, suppliers and partners from all over the map. That broader focus for business requires a global talent management strategy to properly support a global initiative.

We’ll show you what a global talent management strategy consists of, how to build one that delivers measurable business outcomes and how to deploy to a diverse global workforce. During this interactive webinar, Heidi Spirgi, co-founder and president of Knowledge Infusion, will walk you through the process and steps organizations need to go through to build and deploy a global talent management strategy:

  • How to tie your talent management strategy to business initiatives.
  • The importance of developing a long-term talent management strategy to have better business results.
  • How a successful talent management strategy is one designed for the workforce, not the HR department.
  • Why HR departments cannot focus on “go live” when deploying talent management solutions, but rather must focus on user adoption and outputs, ensuring the new system is driving outcomes aligned with the business, not HR goals.

Webinar presented by Heidi Spirgi, Co-Founder & President of Knowledge Infusion
March 14, 2012 – 1:00pm Eastern
Register Online

Invitation to eCornell’s Cocktail Reception at the HR in Hospitality Conference & Expo

Network with members of the eCornell team, as well as faculty from Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration and School of Industrial & Labor Relations.

Tuesday, February 28
5:30pm – 8:00pm
Hilton San Francisco – Financial District
750 Kearny Street
San Francisco, CA
RSVP Online

Are you attending this year’s HR in Hospitality Conference & Expo in San Francisco? If so, we invite you to join us for a cocktail reception at the Hilton San Francisco following the conference. Join your peers at the bar, meet eCornell’s Hospitality Group and make connections with faculty and staff from Cornell University’s world-famous School of Hotel Administration and the School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

We’ll provide an open bar for the first hour and appetizers throughout the evening. We hope you’re able to join us for this unique networking opportunity at this year’s HR in Hospitality Conference & Expo.

RSVP Online